Sweetgreen: Not Traditional

Every generation clashes with its predecessor over traditions. By the time the younger generation is old enough to make their own decisions, the older generation wants to pass down traditions the young don’t want anymore. The same thing happens in the business world; regardless of industry. Learn more about Nathaniel Ru: http://www.businessinsider.com/sweetgreen-founder-interview-nathaniel-ru-2016-3 and http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2016/09/23/bluecart-simplifying-restaurant-orders-video.html

At some point, people got used to the way fast food chains made food. As a new generation comes to power, they want food differently than their parents and grandparents. These days, people want healthier eating options and restaurants that are environmentally conscious of their ingredients. That’s why the legacy restaurant Sweetgreen is growing in popularity.

Sweetgreen is unlike any fast food chain in the world. For a start, it’s a high-end salad restaurant in the United States. Despite the comical disadvantage of serving salads in a meat-loving country like the U.S., Sweetgreen has 40 locations nationwide and plans on adding more next year.

Sweetgreen’s premise isn’t traditional, so why should anything else be. When the co-CEOs opened their first store, they made technology a part of the brand’s DNA. Read more: Nathaniel Ru Blazes a Trail in The Height Food Industry | Affiliate Dork and Nathaniel Ru | Crunchbase

Before it was popular, Sweetgreen used a website and mobile app to encourage faster transactions. Today, nearly a third of their business occurs through their app.

They also created their own way to manage the growth of Sweetgreen. Most businesses would build a main corporate headquarters to oversee national or international operations. The co-CEOs don’t want Sweetgreen to lose its personality, so they run the company using a bicoastal management strategy that allows them to grow the company at their pace.

This is something they thought of during their college days at Georgetown University. They all met in an entrepreneurship class and immediately discovered they had much in common. For instance, all three of them are first-generation immigrants whose parents all owned their own businesses.

Sweetgreen also introduced an atmosphere that most restaurants reject: open kitchens. Since people are more conscious of their foods, Sweetgreen wants to show people their ingredients and how their salads are made. They want no secrets between them and their customers so that customers feel that they can rely on Sweetgreen’s honesty.

The first thing diners notice when walking into a Sweetgreen store is the clean, modern look. It almost resembles an Apple store, giving customers a sense of relief.

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